THIS WEEK'S BULLETIN

Mass Times and Other Services

 

Twenty Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time

 



Saturday 18 October

5.30 

pm

A Tom Smith RIP B Thomas & Agnes Owens and Bridie Ritchie RIP



Sunday

19 October

9.00 

11.00

am

am 

George Eakins Birthday Remembrance

Intentions of Bernie and Maureen McEvoy 



Monday 

20 October

7.45 

8.00 

am

am

Morning Prayer

Intentions of Rose Marie McGrogan



21 October

9.30 

am

Funeral Service for Simon Cosgrove RIP



Wednesday

22 October

8.45 

9.00 

am

am

Morning Prayer

Sister Finbar Grady RIP



Thursday

23 October

6.35 

7.00 

pm

pm

Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament

Patrick Ryan RIP



Friday

24 October

8.45 

9.00

1.00 

am

am

pm

Morning Prayer

Father Peter Robertson RIP

Wedding Service for Joanne Cutler and James Rosa

 

TThirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

 



Saturday 25 October

5.30

pm

A Reg Thompson RIP

B Tom HughesRIP



Sunday

26 October

9.00 

11.00 

am

am

Intentions of the Ashton Family

Intentions Philip Hennessey RIP

NOTICES AND EVENTS

Twenty Ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Scripture Refelection

Paying taxes under duress, to those who use the proceeds in ways that further their own wealth, prestige and power is always galling.

 

However, it is also important to appreciate the positive aspect of taxation; as a worthwhile contribution to the common good. Sure, we want our hard earned money to be spent wisely and efficiently. But we can take some pride in the fact that we live in a society that values its public services, that recognises the need to protect the most vulnerable from the worst effects of illness, unemployment, and disability. That we also respect the dignity of those who have retired and provide protection, nurture and education to our children. When rendering our taxes to governments we are right to expect that they are used well because love of neighbour is one with love of God.


 

 

MERCY

THE ESSENCE OF THE GOSPEL AND THE KEY TO CHRISTIAN LIFE

 

The discussions at the Synod on Family Life and the decision by Pope Francis to make mercy a major feature in his own teaching are both in part influenced by a book written by the Austrian theologian Cardinal Walter Kasper. Shortly before being elected Pope; he received a copy of this book and remarked, "Ah mercy! This is the name of our God." Then in his first Angelus message, the new Pope announced, "This book has done me so much good." Mercy, he said, "changes the world … makes the world less cold and more just. We need to understand properly this mercy of God."

 

Reflecting on devotion to the Sacred Heart, Kasper writes: "In the heart of Jesus, we recognize that God ... has a heart (cor) for us, who are poor (miseri), in the broadest sense of the word." God is therefore "merciful (misericors). In this way, the heart of Jesus is an emblem of God's love, which became incarnate in Jesus Christ." Thus God is one who "recommends," "courts," and "woos" us but does not "force" or "overpower" us.

 

Kasper concludes this discussion by saying, "Mercy courts every human being to the very end; it activates the entire communion of saints on behalf of every individual, while taking human freedom with radical seriousness. Mercy is the good, comforting, uplifting, hope-granting message, on which we can rely in every situation and which we can trust and build upon, both in life and in death. Under the mantle of mercy, there is a place for everyone of good will."

 

 

With a wisdom born of much experience, Kasper seeks not simply to inform but to transform and to do so now. He concludes the book's longest chapter with the message: "The experience of divine mercy encourages and obliges us to become witnesses to mercy in the world. ... Human mercy … is the concrete form of divine mercy in the world." (From a review by Thomas Ryan)

 

Notices

Synod on Family Life

 

One week into the first session the of the Synod its opening discussions have included the proposal by at least some of the participants, that Church teaching on many important issues would benefit from paying much closer attention to the lived experience of ordinary people. A Canadian bishop said they were "finding that the lived experience of people is also a theological source -- what we call a theological source, a place of theological reflection."

 

Archbishop Nicholls reported another interesting suggestion that we might begin to appreciate that people move gradually towards living out fully the kind of moral vision and action proposed by our doctrines. One practical application of this be to have a more tolerant attitude towards those who live together before marriage.

 

There seems to be some recognition of the need to avoid language that belittles or condemns the moral complexities and dilemmas faced by real people; language like ‘living in sin’, “contraceptive mentality," and "intrinsically disordered" may perhaps be consigned to the historical dustbin. Father Tom Rosica who is relaying some of the discussions to the media commented that “the bishops have come to understand that to label people does not help in bringing them to Christ."

 

Another encouraging suggestion is to reform the process of annulments to make the procedures less daunting or complicated and enhance the role of the local bishop in reaching fair and reasonable judgements based on the individual circumstances of those whose marriages have broken down.

 

Encouraging and interesting as these early signs are, history as well as the standing orders for Synod discussions teach us that the outcomes could be otherwise. Nevertheless, there is good cause to continue our prayers that those taking part in these important discussions will heed the advice of Pope Francis to speak boldly and listen humbly to one another. We can also hope that the collective wisdom of those who are gathered from across the globe will take careful note of real lives and the example of Pope Francis in his own dealings with the ordinary concerns of people and his passion for mercy over judgment and the welfare of the poor.

 

Parish Dinner—in previous years we have held this event in July, close to the anniversary of the opening of the church. This year you are invited to come to Spirit Restaurant in Victoria Park on Wednesday 22 October. More details will be provided nearer the time when tickets will be available for approximately £20 a head. Please note the date on your calendar.

Kindly Remember to Pray for

Terry Birchall, Dennis Bradley, Simon Cosgrove & Gwen Dickinson who all died recently, all the faithful  departed and all those living with or recovering from illness or undergoing medical treatment including: Vera Allen, Marc Bailey, Sheila Barton (nee Owen), Molly Birchall, Mary Birks, Ken Boyes, Amanda Bradbury, Vera Bradbury, Archie Brocklehurst, Liz Carroll, Helen Clarke, Irene Clay, Ethan Connolly, Marian Cullen, John Daniels, Monica Dixon, Laurie Finn, Dave Gallop, Teresa  & John Glover, Carol Goodman, Joan Grant, Tom Hopkins, Mary Howard, Gillian Hunter, Graham Hutson, Joan Johnson, Lilly Kelly, Fulvia Large, Esther Lloyd Jones, Renaldo Marcella, Paul McGrath, Agnes McNamara, Abigail McNicholas, Eileen Moyse, Joan Murray, Lois Nicholas, Ron Norman, James O’Hara, May O’Rourke, Mary Pajak, Charles Pendry, Margaret Pickup, Fionuala Price, David Prince, Tony Potter, Margaret Quinn, Christine Rowe, Shelley Scott, Tommy Sharkey, Mark Stacey, Tom & Hazel Sudell, Michael Swift, Ronnie Thompson, Cecily Waite, Rose Walsh, Nancy Warburton, Ben Watson, Ann Weiss, Margaret Wightman, John Williams & Colin Wright.